Ken
Great site, thanks for the great information.  I live in NJ and looking to add heat, my pool is under trees and it just does not get warm enough.  We had a cold spell a few weeks back and the pool has been at 70 degrees ever since!  The kids dont want to go in and either does dad!!  Solar blanket is not much help!

The previous owner put all of the pool equipt in a shed.  I have called my local pool company for recommendations.  I was told I can not put a gas heater inside so that would mean alot more work running pipes outside and then I will have a one unit outside by itself looking a little odd.  They suggested a heat pump and thought it could go inside.  They admitted they do not sell many and was not sure (I think I had a rookie on the phone!).  Not knowing anything on the subject I did a search and found your site. 

My pool is a inground standard 16x32 approx 16K gallons.  Can it go inside?  I already have electric running the pool out there, would you know if I have to run another electric line or could I tap into the existing (running a 1hp motor)?

Thanks

Ken 
Quote
Marcus Miller
Dear Ken:
Thank you for writing to me. Great questions. I like a guy who does his homework. The heat pump will need to go outside the shed. they need lots of fresh air. You just pop a couple of pipes through the wall of the shed. Usually not a problem. Gas in NJ costs a fortune. If the heat pump costs $100.00 a month to operate, a propane heater might cost $400.00 to $500.00 for the same heat. That is why I am sending so many more heat pumps to NJ than gas heaters. In fact NJ is the 3rd most popular place in the country for pool heat pumps. Your 1 HP pump motor is fine. For you size pool look at heat pumps over 100,000 BTU's unless you use a blanket all the time and that you can use an 70,000 through 80,000 BTU heater. I try to get May first through October first in the Northeast. If you want more than that you will need a heat pump that defrosts itself. I hope that helps. The fall is a good time to get the heater installed as prices have been going up 2X a year the last couple of years due to titanium , copper and plastic going crazy. Also pool guys and electricians are usually overwhelmed in the spring and it is nice to start up the heater as soon as you get some nice weather in April or May and not have to have someone fit the heater in the peak season.
 
Sincerely,
Asa Strong
Quote
Ken
Thanks for the quick response.  So the pump does need to go outside?  Thats unfortunate because I will have everything nicely contained inside the shed except for the heat pump.  The pool company stated the pump could go inside and because it is pretty warm inside then that is even better as it will be able to pull warmer air.  Does this make sense?  Again, I trust your imput on this then them but I wanted to be assured I have all possible information. 

Also, and again a rookie question, but the more I think about it I want to install it myself.  I have made various repairs with plastic piping in the past (major sprinkler issues) and know my way around just enough to be dangerous.  Reading some of the post and looking at your customer pictures has given me more confidence.  I assume the pool lines would need to be blown out as if I was closing the pool for the winter anyway to install, correct? 


Quote
Marcus Miller
Dear Ken:
Thank you for writing back to me. There are no Rookie questions; just Rookie answers. It should go outside. They put out 5000 Cubic feet a minute of air and it would turn any room into a meat locker on a few minutes and then you would lose all your efficiency. some people put a 30" duct on the top of the heater and send all the air out of the enclosure. Please check with a factory engineer before you do it. The last time I had an application problem was 4 years ago when a chicken farmer in Arkansas put the heater inside his pool room. The feathers flew back and forth on that one until he gave up and put it outside. The water piping is easy. You just have to glue two pipes: in and out. Really 95% of the job is just getting an electrician. Most heater have drains on them. Can't hurt to blow them out in the winter. Don't give up yet. We still might have a month or 2 of swimming.

 
Sincerely,
 
Asa Strong
Quote
Ken
Thanks again for your help.  After looking at the pictures on your site of heat pumps installed by your customers, I now see what you mean.  They look just like my air conditioner unit and those blow alot of air!!  My little shed would be a wind tunnel! 

I'll have to look at options for install as the location of my shed in my yard (very close to the property line in the corner) only gives me really one side which is right where everyone would see and hear it.  Are the pumps loud like my air conditioners?  That also would influence my decision as right now I like the quietness of the pumps hidden in the shed. 

Again, THANKS!
Quote
Marcus Miller
Thank you for writing back to me. I hope that you and your family are well. Pool heat pumps should sound like a quite central air conditioner. Mostly air noise. I find the water pump sometimes makes more noise. I have a heat pump under my bedroom window for 5 years. It ran in the day so it didn't bother me. The noise really has not been a problem. Some people put up shrubs around the heater or a privacy fence to cut down the noise a bit.. Again it hasn't been a problem. I hope that helps.

Sincerely,
Asa Strong
Quote
Deleting Attachment...